How big is the largest blue whale?

How big is the largest blue whale ever recorded?

The longest blue whale on record is a female measured at a South Georgia whaling station in the South Atlantic (1909); she was 110′ 17″ (33.58m) long. The heaviest blue whale was also a female hunted in the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, on March 20, 1947.

How big is the biggest whale in the world?

The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus ssp. Intermedia) is the biggest animal on the planet, weighing up to 400,000 pounds (approximately 33 elephants) and reaching up to 98 feet in length.

What is bigger than a blue whale?

While there might never be a larger animal than the blue whale, there are other kinds of organism that dwarf it. The largest of them all, dubbed the “humongous fungus”, is a honey mushroom (Armillaria ostoyae).

How big is a blue whale compared to a human?

A large blue whale can be longer than two standard school buses! That’s just amazing to me. School buses can seat as many as 40 people. So about 80 people could hang out on a blue whale.

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Has a whale ever killed a human?

While orca attacks on humans in the wild are rare, and no fatal attacks have been recorded, as of 2019 four humans have died due to interactions with captive orcas. Tilikum was involved in three of those deaths.

Has a whale ever eaten a human?

While the veracity of the story is in question, it is physically possible for a sperm whale to swallow a human whole, as they are known to swallow giant squid whole. However, such a person would be crushed, drowned or suffocated in the whale’s stomach.

How big is a blue whale brain?

The Evolutionary Significance of Brain Size. One of the most striking differences between nervous systems is their size (measured as weight or volume) – the brain of a blue whale weighs up to 9 kg while that of a locust weighs less than a gram (Figure 5).

What is the heaviest animal in the world?

The blue whale is the heaviest animal ever known to have existed.

Heaviest living animals.

Rank 1
Animal Blue whale
Average mass [tonnes] 110
Maximum mass [tonnes] 190
Average total length [m (ft)] 24 (79)

What is the largest animal ever?

Blue whale

Has there ever been a bigger animal than the blue whale?

But now, a newly discovered ichthyosaur could give this normal-looking reptile a claim to fame as the largest animal that ever existed. If size estimates are accurate, this creature could have measured up to 26 meters (85 feet) long — for comparison, blue whales top out around 25 meters (82 feet).

Which is the strongest whale?

It has established that blue whales are the strongest, in terms of the absolute amount of force they can generate. They are stronger than other large whales, including the massive sperm whale, the largest toothed cetacean, although they are not the strongest relative to their body size.

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What’s bigger blue whale or sperm whale?

Blue Whale is the largest animal that is alive, and it grows to an enormous length of more than 100 ft long and can weigh more than 150 tons. Sperm Whale or Physeter macrocephalus is considered as the largest toothed whales and largest toothed predator.

What eats a blue whale?

Because of their size, power and speed, adult blue whales have virtually no natural ocean predators. The only sea creature known to attack blue whales is the orca whale (scientific name: Orcinus orca) also known as the “killer whale”. They have been known to work in groups to attack blue whales.

How deep can a whale dive?

The deepest recorded dive was 2,992 metres, breaking the record for diving mammals. Experts have suggested that this dive was unusually deep for this species. A more normal depth would be 2,000 metres. Sperm whales also regularly dive 1,000 to 2,000 metres deep.

Are blue whales dangerous?

Interestingly, though they are enormous, blue whales are not predatory. They filter feed for tiny krill and are totally harmless to people (other than through accidental collisions).

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